revoke

revoke, reverse, repeal, rescind, recall are close synonyms when they mean to abrogate by undoing something previously done, especially in legal context.
Revoke implies a calling back, annulling, abrogating; thus, a testator may revoke his will and make a new one; a benefactor may revoke a gift to an institution; a license board may revoke a license
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the court revoked its sentence of death

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the Edict of Nantes was revoked by King Louis XIV

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Reverse (see also REVERSE) usually implies the action of a higher court in overthrowing a law, a decree, or a decision previously made; it commonly suggests that the earlier law, decree, or decision has been disputed and that the case is now settled by this annulment, unless there is still a higher court to which an appeal may be carried. Reverse is, however, still occasionally used in the broader sense of revoke, with an implication of upsetting, when it applies to actions, decisions, or judgments of a personal or official but not judicial nature
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the teacher reversed his judgment of the boy when he heard the full story

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the umpire reversed his decision after conferring with his colleague

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Repeal applies to a law or statute which is revoked by authority, usually by the authority of the body that made it, but sometimes by the executive power or by the vote of the suffrage
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the Eighteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States was repealed when the Twenty-first Amendment was passed

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Parliament has repealed several of the statutes made against noncon- formists

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Rescind implies the exercise of the proper authority in abolishing or making void. It may suggest exercise of legal, judicial, or legislative authority, or it may suggest the exercise of the summary authority of a sovereign, dictator, master, or parent
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the council of ten had . . . power over the senate and other magistrates, rescinding their decisions— Hallam

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the monks petitioned, and the vote was rescindedFreeman

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In legal use rescind as applied to a contract means that it is voided and is as though it never had been.
Recall (see also REMEMBER) is not a technical term though used sometimes of legal or judicial acts. It is capable of wider use than any of the other of these terms and can on occasion replace any of the others
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recall a bid in bridge

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one cannot recall a sentence to death, if it has been carried out

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they recalled the hasty decree— Gibbon

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Analogous words: *annul, abrogate, void: cancel, expunge, *erase: invalidate, *nullify

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • revoke — re·voke /ri vōk/ vt re·voked, re·vok·ing: to annul by recalling or taking back: as a: to destroy the effectiveness of (a will) by executing another or by an act of destruction (as tearing or crossing out) b: to put an end to (a trust) c: to… …   Law dictionary

  • revoke — re‧voke [rɪˈvəʊk ǁ ˈvoʊk] verb [transitive] LAW to officially state that a law, official document, agreement etc is no longer effective: • We had no alternative but to revoke the contract. revocable adjective : • Four events are mentioned that… …   Financial and business terms

  • Revoke — Re*voke , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Revoked};p. pr. & vb. n. {Revoking}.] [F. r[ e]voquer, L. revocare; pref. re re + vocare to call, fr. vox, vocis, voice. See {Voice}, and cf. {Revocate}.] 1. To call or bring back; to recall. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Revoke — Re*voke , n. (Card Playing) The act of revoking. [1913 Webster] She [Sarah Battle] never made a revoke. Lamb. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Revoke — Re*voke , v. i. (Card Playing) To fail to follow suit when holding a card of the suit led, in violation of the rule of the game; to renege. Hoyle. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • revoke — (v.) late 14c., from O.Fr. revoquer, from L. revocare rescind, call back, from re back (see RE (Cf. re )) + vocare to call, related to vox (gen. vocis) voice, sound, tone, call (see VOICE (Cf. voice) (n.)). Relat …   Etymology dictionary

  • revoke — [v] take back; cancel abjure, abolish, abrogate, annul, back out of, backpedal*, call back, call off, countermand, counterorder, declare null and void*, deny, disclaim, dismantle, dismiss, disown, erase, expunge, forswear, invalidate, lift,… …   New thesaurus

  • revoke — ► VERB ▪ end the validity or operation of (a decree, decision, or promise). DERIVATIVES revocable adjective revocation noun revoker noun. ORIGIN Latin revocare call back …   English terms dictionary

  • revoke — [ri vōk′] vt. revoked, revoking [ME revoken < MFr revoquer < L revocare < re , back + vocare, to call: see VOICE] 1. to withdraw, repeal, rescind, cancel, or annul (a law, permit, etc.) 2. Now Rare to recall vi. Card Games to fail to… …   English World dictionary

  • Revoke — In trick taking card games, a revoke (or renege) is a violation of important rules regarding the play of tricks serious enough to render the round invalid. A revoke is a violation ranked in seriousness somewhat below overt cheating, with the… …   Wikipedia

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